Safety News

Stena Clyde Tragedy: Continued Govt Inaction

Today is the three year anniversary of the tragedy which cost Peter Meddens and Barry Denholm their lives on the Stena Clyde oil rig in the Bass Strait off the coast of Victoria.

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MUA in Mourning After Member Fatality Offshore

The Maritime Union of Australia passes on its sincerest condolences to Andrew Kelly’s family after the seafaring member was crushed between two containers working off the coast of Dampier yesterday.

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Breakthrough Win in NSCOP Battle

Against the odds, the Maritime Union of Australia achieved an upset win in its ongoing campaign for a National Stevedoring Code of Practice with members of Safe Work Australia yesterday voting to approve it as a code. 

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MUA Recognises International Workers' Memorial Day

The Maritime Union of Australia has joined the chorus of unions in remembering the millions of people who are killed or injured at work each year.

This year the MUA is supporting the Australian Council of Trade Union’s moves to make company directors liable for Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) fines resulting from workplace deaths.

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ACTU call for company directors to be personally liable for workplace deaths

The ACTU has called on the government to strengthen national OHS laws and make directors personally fined and/or jailed for up to 20 years to ensure companies cannot restructure to avoid paying fines as a result of negligent conduct.

Forty six Australian workers have died at work this year, but there is no provision in OHS laws to for directors to be held personally accountable if those deaths are a result of company negligence.

In Australia, the average fine for a workplace fatality is around $100,000, which would equate to a fraction of the profit of large businesses making billions of dollars a year.

These laws would help strengthen workplace safety.

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Members Fight Back on Marine Order 32 attack

Ever since it was elected, the Abbott Government has attacked the living standards of Australian Workers. Now, our safety on the job is under threat. The latest casualty is Marine Order 32 - the bible for wharfie safety. Meanwhile, the Government has blocked the National Stevedoring Code of Practice (NSCOP), along with 12 other lifesaving codes. It's time to fight back.

Help make the Abbott Govt a one term wonder. To take action click here now, or read on to find out about the changes.

 

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Safety Bulletin: Safe Access to Vessels

Safe Access to Vessels

Members are advised to comply with Marine Orders at all times when accessing vessels.

What you need to know:
1. The master to provide a safe means of access to the vessel. Safe means of access means a gangway or cargo ramp as defined in Schedule 9 of MO21. A safe means of access must be in place at all times when accessing the vessel.
2. Cellular container ships must have at least one safe means of access to the cargo space at all times: MO32 Schedule 2 section 6.
3. Other types of ships built after 1 Aug 1998 must have at least two safe means of access to the cargo space: MO32 schedule 2 section 7.
4. A personnel cradle may be used to access containers in some circumstances. For example, to access to top a container. See MO32 Schedule 2 section 8. But this does not take away the requirement for the gangway to be in place at all times. Members should stay inside the cage, wear a harness

Offence: accessing vessels in contravention of Marine Orders

Members are reminded: it is an offence to access a vessel, or authorize another person to board or leave a vessel on foot, other than as prescribed in Marine Orders. See sections 17.1(d) and 23 of Marine Order 32 and section 67 of Marine Order 21.

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Vale Brad Fletcher

The MUA joins Maritime Union of New Zealand in mourning Lyttelton Branch President Brad Fletcher who died at work on Thursday.

MUA National Secretary Paddy Crumlin passed on his condolences to Brad’s family on behalf of the union.

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No Action on Offshore Safety Concerns Two Years on from Stena Clyde Deaths

Today marks two years since the deaths of two workers on the Stena Clyde oil rig in the Bass Strait off the coast of Victoria and still no action has been taken over long-standing safety concerns.

Unions are calling on the Federal Government to launch a review into the National Offshore Petroleum Safety and Environment Management Authority (NOPSEMA), which is responsible for the investigation into the deaths.

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Employers Say Preventing Injury and Death is too Expensive

The national safety regulator has shown it is at the behest of big business after downgrading safety regulations that had the potential to save lives and prevent injury at work.

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